Big income . . . and big debt?

Celebrities – and ‘regular folk’ too – often file bankruptcy or consumer proposal for similar reasons:

Limited financial education: If, like a whirlwind celebrity’s (think YouTube insta-sensation) rise to fame you go from having nothing to having the world at your fingertips, a financial education is not usually part of the package. Learning how to effectively save, budget, and invest can take years, and sometimes a team of help, to achieve. When handed huge checks to cash, many celebs go out and buy the biggest house and fastest car, rather than learning how to properly handle their money.

For ‘mere mortals’ a significant career promotion with pay increase (or an inheritance or elusive lottery win) can add a boost to our credibility and add some additional buying power. But, it’s essential to learn how to manage your money, your budget and your long-term financial planning.

Materialism: Our culture can be highly materialistic. It prompts some people to try to ‘one up’ each other with larger houses or forever be ‘keeping up with the Joneses’ with more expensive vehicles. Young people, in particular, can be susceptible to the ‘celeb mindset’ believing their ownership of the latest designer handbag or electronic item is a given. The easy access to credit cards to people with limited income and often limited money management experience (see above) can lead to serious debt problems.

Celebrities, like the rest of us, can get caught up in having the finer things in life. But, a great TV gig can get cancelled and when the paycheques stop rolling in, it’s harder and harder to maintain that same standard of living without getting into serious debt.

Lack of investment in self: Often the stars surround themselves with lawyers, accountants, and insurance professionals to help them with proper estate, tax, and insurance planning. Sometimes they don’t double-check the work done on their behalf, or they don’t properly vet the financial professionals they hire. Not surprisingly, many fall prey to unscrupulous advisors.

The lesson here for ‘man on the street’ is to take ultimate responsibility for your own financial affairs. Yes, seek the advice of proven professionals. Ask other trusted sources for referrals. Get second opinions. And – refer again to the info above – get educated!

If you are facing financial struggles or would like some help with managing your debt—one of our professionals is available to discuss your situation. There are many options available to help and you may not need to go bankrupt. Contact us for a confidential, no-obligation, complimentary consultation. Call us toll at 310 8888.

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The payday loan love affair is over (or should be).

It’s February and the month has been aglow with talk of love and romance. However, one relationship that is waning in appeal (and rightly so) is Canadians’ love affair with payday loans.

These small, short-term unsecured loans are rarely linked to a repayment date aligned to a borrower’s payday—but that was the initial concept: If you are short of money and can repay a loan once you get paid . . . then come on down!

Sometimes these loans are called ‘cash advances’ and they typically rely on the borrower having previous payroll and employment records.

Payday loans may seem attractive to some consumers in need of ready cash but consider that for a $15 charge on a $100 14-day payday loan the annual percentage rate is over 391%*!

In addition to being expensive, payday loans are also a short-sighted way to address financial troubles. If you are regularly strapped for cash and have maxed out other (more cost-effective) sources of credit it may be a sign that you are carrying an unreasonable and unmanageable debt load.

Payday loans will not help ease your debt problems; they are an expensive way to just keep your head above water. Bottom line, if you are struggling to make ends meet and drowning in debt repayment, it’s time to look at available options to solve your problems—for the long term.

You might consider a consolidation loan (to address your debts), but you may not qualify because of your debt ratio or impacted credit score.

One popular option is a Consumer Proposal. It focuses on what you are capable of paying (not just what you owe)—this could be 75% less than the total amount you owe. You can qualify for a Consumer Proposal if you owe up to $250,000 of non-mortgage debt—and most debts can be covered. This essentially allows you a fresh start.

With the guidance of a Trustee you negotiate to pay creditors all, or a portion, of your debt over a specific time period or to extend the time allowed to pay the entire debt. You need the majority of creditors to agree to the proposal—then all unsecured creditors are bound by it.

It’s time to break off the unsatisfying relationship with payday loans and develop a sound financial future.

If you are facing financial struggles or would like some help with managing your debt—one of our professionals is available to discuss your situation. There are many options available to help and you may not need to go bankrupt. Contact us for a confidential, no-obligation, complimentary consultation. Call us toll free from anywhere in Alberta 310 8888. www.gt.alger.ca

*Estimate, actual amounts may vary.