Tips for Valentine’s Day on a budget

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If you’re having trouble making ends meet, you don’t have to succumb to holiday pressure and spend money you don’t have just to show someone you love them. Some of our Licensed Insolvency Trustees across the country exposed their romantic side by sharing these great low-to-no-cost tips for having a memorable Valentines Day in 2017.

ALBERTA:

Freida Richer tells us how to have a romantic day in Alberta without breaking the bank!

  • Outdoor skating: Bundle up and head outdoors for skating at Olympic Plaza or snowshoeing at Bragg Creek or the Kanasksis Silver Skate Festival and enjoy Edmonton’s picturesque Hawrelak Park in the River Valley. You can get hot chocolate there or bring some of your own for afterwards and have a romantic winter picnic.
  • Plan and prepare a romantic dinner at home together: Staying in is a great way to save money, and enjoying a meal at home can be more romantic than eating dinner in a noisy, crowded restaurant. Set the stage with candles, and dig out your good dishes and wine glasses!
  • Explore the city: Exploring your own neighbourhood with your loved one is a romantic way to spend an evening without breaking the bank. There are plenty of activities around town that are perfect for a date night on a budget including a Telus Spark adult night a few days before Valentine’s Day, the Penguin March at the Calgary Zoo, cheap seats at the Calgary philharmonic (which start at $25), or try cooking classes at SAIT or  “Get Cooking, MacEwan University”.

HALIFAX:

We discovered Rob McLernon is a romantic at heart when he shared these tips with us.

  • Outdoor skating at the Emera Oval: Plan a romantic outing to the Emera Oval with your significant other and enjoy an evening of skating under the stars. Bring some hot chocolate and snacks for afterwards and have a romantic winter picnic
  • Explore the Halifax / Dartmouth waterfront: Walk the boardwalk, take the ferry across the harbor, and stop into a coffee shop for a snack. Exploring your own neighbourhood with your loved one is an exciting way to spend a romantic evening without breaking the bank
  • Plan and prepare a romantic dinner at home together: Staying in is a great way to save money, and enjoying a meal at home can be more romantic than eating dinner in a noisy, crowded restaurant. Set the stage with candles, and dig out your good dishes and wine glasses!
  • Go snowshoeing: Consider renting some snowshoes or cross country skis (or better yet, borrow equipment from a friend) and head out for a jaunt in Shubie Park or Point Pleasant Park.

CAPE BRETON ISLAND:

Thanks to Cape Breton, Nova Scotia Licensed Insolvency Trustee Blaire MacNeil for these tips for planning Valentine’s Day activities around the island.

  • Venture outdoors: Consider renting some snowshoes or cross country skis (or borrow equipment from friends) and head out for a snowshoe hike around the Clyburn Loop at the Clyburn Trail in the Cape Breton Highlands National Park.
  • Go to the movies – it’s cheap night: Movie tickets are cheaper on Tuesdays, and Valentine’s Day just happens to fall on a Tuesday this year! Take advantage of cheap night and grab a couple cheap movie tickets for you and your significant other.
  • Cook a romantic dinner together: Staying in is a great way to save money, and enjoying a meal at home can be more romantic than eating dinner in a noisy, crowded restaurant. Set the stage with candles, and dig out the good dishes and wine glasses.
  • Attend a community hall dance: If staying in is not your thing, the Practical Nursing Students are hosting a Valentine’s dance with a silent auction on Saturday, Feb 11 from 9pm to 1 am at Grand Lake Road Fire Dept. All proceeds go towards Loaves and Fishes, and tickets are $15 per couple! Call 902-317-1389 for tickets.

NEW BRUNSWICK:

Kristi Stuart and the New Brunswick team shared these tips.

  • Outdoor Skating: Plan a romantic evening of outdoor skating at the Arts & Culture Park in Quispamsis, or skate to music under the stars at Lily Lake Pavilion in Saint John. Bring some hot chocolate and snacks for afterwards and have a romantic winter picnic
  • Plan a romantic stroll through Rockwood Park: Bundle up, grab your loved one, and embark on a romantic stroll through Rockwood Park. Bring some hot chocolate and snacks and have a romantic winter picnic after your walk
  • Cook a romantic dinner together: Staying in is a great way to save money, and enjoying a meal at home can be more romantic than eating dinner in a noisy, crowded restaurant. Set the stage with candles, and dig out the good dishes and wine glasses!

If your debt load is causing you stress beyond trying to plan the perfect Valentines Day gift, contact one of our debt help professionals near you for a free, no obligation debt consultation.

Black Friday & Cyber Monday: How to get past the hype and shop smart

pexels-photo-230544_72Door crasher deals. Limited quantities available. Lowest prices of the year – 4 days only!

With the holidays right around the corner and discounted deals constantly advertised to you, Black Friday and Cyber Monday is a time when you can get wrapped up in spending. Online shopping has become more prevalent and more convenient than ever before but can quickly send you into a spiral of debt if you’re not careful.

There is a psychology behind all the advertising and promotions surrounding Black Friday and Cyber Monday. It’s important to be aware that retail “events” like these are really just marketing tactics meant to over-hype discounts and deals that could promote and result in overspending. The advertising feeds on our emotions and plays into the fear many of us have of missing out on something big. There is a lot of buzz and excitement created as marketers aim to whip shoppers into a frenzy by putting high demand items on at seemingly deeply discounted prices — available only for a short period of time.

If you aren’t careful, you will end up buying more than you had intended – and spending more than you have by using credit and buying impulsively. If you are planning to participate in big retail days like Black Friday/Cyber Monday, be smart about it.

Tips for Smart Shopping

  • Don’t shop because you fear “missing out on something big”. The reality is that deals or discounts come in waves and will be available at multiple times throughout the year. Do the math to determine if it’s really a “deal” not to be missed.
  • Give yourself a financial reality check before shopping. It’s important for you to quickly pull out a statement of your largest debt (credit card or loan statement) to see the dollar amount owing on that account. You need to think about how you will feel tomorrow if you add on more debt today. Decide if it’s worth it.
  • Make a list. With discounts available on so many products, it can be easy to lose track of what you are looking for and make impulse purchases you will regret later. Making a list of exactly what is needed allows you to be in control of where your money is going.
  • Set a budget and stick to it. In addition to planning which items are on your list, set a strict budget of how much you are able and willing to spend. As you are shopping, keep a tab of how much you are spending and cut yourself off once you reach that limit. Despite the discounts being offered, some items may simply be beyond a reasonable budget.
  • Be aware that online shopping can result in overspending. These days, people don’t have to leave their homes to participate in Black Friday/Cyber Monday shopping. The problems with the ease of shopping via your home computer or cell phone is that you will likely use a credit card for the purchase and you’ll end up purchasing multiple items within a short time frame since it’s very easy to submit a payment and move on to the next item.
  • Is it really a “deal” if I buy it on credit? If you buy that great deal on credit, are paying only the minimum monthly payments on your credit card balance and it takes you more than 6 months to pay off your purchases, your overall cost with interest will end up voiding any original deal or discount you are getting.

Overall, just be honest with yourself about your financial situation. With the weakened economy and the unfavorable US exchange rate, many consumers do not have the financial means to participate in holiday shopping. If you are living pay cheque to pay cheque, assess if holiday shopping is a smart financial decision or if there are more economical gift options you can explore, like giving the gift of your time or making home-made gifts.

Do you have some great tips you use to avoid overspending? We’d love to hear them.

I’ve overspent! Now what?!

If you’ve already shopped and fear you overspent, don’t remove the tags. Leave the items in the bag and look at them the next day to decide if you still feel the same excitement. You might discover that an item in the bag was more a want than a need and you can still return it.

What are some warning signs that you are spending more than you should?
• You’ve maxed out your credit card (and are already only making the minimum payments).
• You feel guilty about your purchases – knowing you’ve bought ‘wants’ and not ‘needs’.
• You’re regularly spending more than you make.
• You’re dipping into your savings.

If you recognize some of these warning signs and are feeling the pressure of carrying an overwhelming amount of consumer debt, book a free consultation with one of our Licensed Insolvency Trustees. They can look at your personal financial situation during a confidential, no obligation meeting and make recommendations on what options are available to you.

freida_hs
Freida Richer is a Licensed Insolvency Trustee with our Edmonton, Alberta practice. You can watch her Money Smarts segment on the third Monday of every month on Global Morning News Edmonton.

 

 

How much is it really costing you? Credit cards and smart shopping.

When was the last time you put a purchase on your credit card? For most people making purchases on their credit cards is a daily, if not weekly, occurrence. So when was the last time you looked at the interest rate on your credit card? Or calculated how long it would take for you to pay off that purchase?

We often ask what makes a person choose when to call a Trustee for help with their debt. As Angela Lock, CIRP a Trustee in our Calgary office mentioned, “People tell me they are seeing these notes on their credit card statements of how long it will take them to pay the balance, and for most its shocking”.

Can you imagine buying an iPhone and having it take 2 years to pay it off? Assuming you put this purchase on your credit card, at 17% interest, that $859.00 iPhone would cost you an additional $300.

Most of us don’t think of these things when we are making purchases. Here are some tips to help keep you paying less in interest fees and keeping more in your pocket:

  • Do your homework. Find the best possible deals and make a list of the items you intend to purchase. Don’t purchase anything outside of this list.
  • Determine your budget before embarking on a shopping trip. Once you spend your budgeted amount, do not purchase anything else.
  • Whenever possible, spend using debit or cash – or if shopping online, set up a PayPal account where offered and make purchases using that instead of your credit card.

We have become a generation less accustomed to making purchases with cash and feeling the transaction of money leaving our hands, we have become reliant on the ease of ‘paying with plastic’ so being aware of our finances can get away from our immediate attention.

Putting off dealing with debt – missing payments, living paycheck to paycheck, transferring money around to deal with debts – can lead the problem to get worse and worse and get out of control. Taking the first step to seek out help can be the hardest step towards a fresh financial start. But by calling a licensed trustee you can get free financial advice or help with filing a consumer proposal which can reduce consumer debt by up to 75 percent.

Contact us to talk to a Trustee in Canada.

Visit us online:

AB: www.GT.Alger.ca                   
BC: www.GTdebt.ca   
ON: www.ThunderBayBankruptcy.com
NS: www.wedlakeinc.com



Which is the best method for paying down debt: Snowball or Avalanche?

Avalanche method recommends paying highest interest debt first, while snowball advocates smallest amount first.

Many of us have used our credit cards, cash advances and borrowed money over the holidays, shopped our way though the malls, ordered online and picked up gift cards for our friends, family, coworkers and picked up those little secret Santa gifts, all of this adding to the costs of the holidays. We purchased a turkey or ham, all of the trimmings, some spirits, made baked goods and bought boxes of chocolates.

Aside from the 5lbs you would like to lose, how many of us are going to be going on a debt diet over the next few months? Which is the best method to conquer those few debt pounds we plan to lose?

Blake Elyea, from our Vancouver office spoke to Canadian Press about some of his thoughts regarding the Avalanche method and the Snowball method, but which will work best for you?

‘Avalanche’ involves paying highest interest first

The avalanche method involves tackling the highest interest rate debts first — an approach that can save you money on interest payments, but may require more willpower if your highest-interest debts are also the largest ones.

“Mathematically that’s the best approach,” Elyea says. “However, you’re not going to see the instant results necessarily as quickly with that approach. It’s going to take more discipline.”

If you’re going to adopt the avalanche approach, you should be checking your balance and tracking progress and making a small budget to reward yourself when you reach your  short term goals.

‘Snowball’ method tackles small debt first

The snowball approach, popularized by U.S. radio and TV personality Dave Ramsey, involves tackling your debts from smallest to largest.

Knocking off the smallest balances first — while maintaining the minimum payments on all the other debts — gives the debtor some “quick wins,” making it a good approach for those who need to see some instant results in order to stay motivated, says Elyea.

“We all like instant gratification,” says Elyea. “We want to see that we’re making progress.”

It’s your choice

Although the avalanche method will save money on interest payments compared with the snowball technique, Elyea says any strategy that involves taking stock of your financial situation and actively tackling your debt load is a good one.

“If you have a structured way you’re going to approach your debt, either method is going to get you there,” says Elyea. “One might take you a bit longer than the other.”

If you are in a position where your debts feel overwhelming, one option might be to get a free consultation from a licensed trustee, not only can a trustee assist with helping you to plan and budget, but they may be able to offer additional debt reduction suggestions such as a  consumer proposal, an informal proposal to creditors, and, in certain situations to file for bankruptcy.

Whatever your financial situation may be after the holidays, if you feel financially hungover, there are options, take stock, develop a plan and reach out for help if needed.

Grant Thornton – Canada | We provide solutions for people with debt and financial challenges.

If you are facing financial struggles or would like some help with managing your debt—one of our professionals is available to discuss your situation. There are many options available, ask us about a consumer proposal. Contact us for a confidential, no-obligation, complimentary consultation. Call us toll free at 310 8888.

Excerpts adopted from the Canadian Press article: http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/debt-experts-recommend-avalanche-strategy-but-snowball-works-too-1.2886215

Not our parents’ generation when it comes to personal debt

It’s been said before:  In a number of ways, we are not like our parents’ generation. Things will always change. Bottom line, we often think and act differently from our parents.

Perhaps new technology and the digital revolution spring to mind first?  It’s true. From the fax and laptop to smart phones and wearable technology, the world looks and works in many new, and evolving, ways.

What’s also true is our change in attitude and actions when it comes to personal debt. In 2012, the Globe and Mail reported on a poll conducted by a firm of bankruptcy trustees. The results show that most Canadians are quite comfortable with using debt as a financial strategy. Yet, this was a time when debt loads had risen to alarming new highs. The survey found that nine out of 10 respondents would consider borrowing money to cover an unexpected expense that was not an emergency.

By contrast, in the 1960s, families frequently lived a ‘middle class’ lifestyle and managed to own a home on one income (usually the Dad’s). The mindset was typically to save for needed things—rather than to borrow. And, this lifestyle rarely included the additional luxuries we see fairly common in our lives today: second cars, cable TV, eating out, vacations and plane travel, smart phones and tablets, pricey gym or golf memberships, designer duds etc.

The downside to our view of what constitutes the appropriate lifestyle of the 21st century is that to acquire and maintain this level of consumerism we may spend more than we earn (a concept that would rarely be considered acceptable in the 1960s)! In our work at Grant Thornton, we often see where this can lead:  Consistently living beyond ones means, borrowing, excessive purchasing and maximizing high-interest credit cards can put individuals and families into highly stressful situations with increasing debt loads (whether we believe we can afford it or not).

Our role is to help people address their debt problems and find ways to rebuild a solid financial future. We can help with tips and reminders so that you may not need our assistance again in the future, including: disaster proof your life (get your life insurance and an emergency fund in place), spend less than you earn, aggressively pay down high interest debt, read the fine print on any purchase agreements (you may be liable for significant interest payments if you miss the eventual payment due date) and delay consumption (save for that vacation rather than charge it).
If you are facing financial struggles or would like some help with managing your debt—one of our professionals is available to discuss your situation. There are many options available, ask us about a consumer proposal.  Contact us for a confidential, no-obligation, complimentary consultation. Call us toll free at 310 8888.

BC: www.gtdebthelp.com

AB: www.GT.Alger.com

Big income . . . and big debt?

Celebrities – and ‘regular folk’ too – often file bankruptcy or consumer proposal for similar reasons:

Limited financial education: If, like a whirlwind celebrity’s (think YouTube insta-sensation) rise to fame you go from having nothing to having the world at your fingertips, a financial education is not usually part of the package. Learning how to effectively save, budget, and invest can take years, and sometimes a team of help, to achieve. When handed huge checks to cash, many celebs go out and buy the biggest house and fastest car, rather than learning how to properly handle their money.

For ‘mere mortals’ a significant career promotion with pay increase (or an inheritance or elusive lottery win) can add a boost to our credibility and add some additional buying power. But, it’s essential to learn how to manage your money, your budget and your long-term financial planning.

Materialism: Our culture can be highly materialistic. It prompts some people to try to ‘one up’ each other with larger houses or forever be ‘keeping up with the Joneses’ with more expensive vehicles. Young people, in particular, can be susceptible to the ‘celeb mindset’ believing their ownership of the latest designer handbag or electronic item is a given. The easy access to credit cards to people with limited income and often limited money management experience (see above) can lead to serious debt problems.

Celebrities, like the rest of us, can get caught up in having the finer things in life. But, a great TV gig can get cancelled and when the paycheques stop rolling in, it’s harder and harder to maintain that same standard of living without getting into serious debt.

Lack of investment in self: Often the stars surround themselves with lawyers, accountants, and insurance professionals to help them with proper estate, tax, and insurance planning. Sometimes they don’t double-check the work done on their behalf, or they don’t properly vet the financial professionals they hire. Not surprisingly, many fall prey to unscrupulous advisors.

The lesson here for ‘man on the street’ is to take ultimate responsibility for your own financial affairs. Yes, seek the advice of proven professionals. Ask other trusted sources for referrals. Get second opinions. And – refer again to the info above – get educated!

If you are facing financial struggles or would like some help with managing your debt—one of our professionals is available to discuss your situation. There are many options available to help and you may not need to go bankrupt. Contact us for a confidential, no-obligation, complimentary consultation. Call us toll at 310 8888.

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Happy upcoming September ‘New Year’

For many of us, September feels more like the start of a New Year than January does. September marks the end of summer and brings a ‘back-to-school’ reality that we feel (whether or not we have school-aged children).

September is a time to re-focus, get back to work and also—back on budget!

If you have back-to-school-shopping to tackle, then budgeting is essential. Too often compelling advertising, apparent sales and our child’s idea of what they need, can cause us to spend more than we have . . . and more than we can afford. Buying clothing, back packs, lunch boxes, stationery supplies and electronics can be an expensive undertaking. If your child is off to college or university the costs can be even higher to set up dorm rooms and to purchase books, food plans and transit passes.

A good start to managing your budget is to involve your child in the planning. Refer to lists the school or post-secondary institution has provided. Remind your offspring of the difference between ‘needs’ and ‘wants’ (it will serve them well for their future money management too). Determine together what is essential for when school starts and what can wait to see if it is really required. Encourage your child to pay something towards some of the ‘needs’ from their savings; or at least to pay for their perceived must-have from the ‘wants’ list. There are many back-to-school budget planners online to help you track planned and actual expenditures. These can help you avoid impulse purchases and stay within budget.

Budgeting for upcoming expenses

Balancing the budget

 

But what if you don’t have back to school expenses…

September can also the ideal time to pause and refocus on your personal or family finances. It’s a good opportunity to revisit your near and long term goals.

In the near term you might be looking at how you’re going to plan and pay for the expenses associated with the upcoming holidays (both Thanksgiving and Christmas) or deal with the additional rising costs of heating and electricity. There is also thinking about getting yourself ready, do you have what you need for fall and winter (ie:a fall/winter coat and other clothing)?

If you are carry debt, resume your commitment to paying it off; remember to start first with high interest rate credit cards. It can be a time to check in again on your household budget and ways to trim expenses. And, it can be an opportunity to start saving for upcoming holiday spending. Even a little money put away each week starting now, can help toward the costs of future Christmas or Hanukah celebrations.

If you are facing financial struggles or would like some help with managing your debt—one of our professionals is available to discuss your situation. There are many options available to help and you may not need to go bankrupt. Contact us for a confidential, no-obligation, complimentary consultation. Call us toll free in at 310 8888.

 

 

Meeting with a Bankruptcy Trustee is no scarier than dinner with your in-laws.

When you’re struggling with unmanageable debt, we know everything else in your life can suffer. The thousands of people we have helped over the years share similar stories. They’ve told us of struggling to pay the minimum amount on credit cards, borrowing from one card to pay another, liquidating assets to pay bills and still being overwhelmed with day-to-day financial obligations. We know this can happen to anyone. Suddenly a change in your work, health or personal situation can take you from managing—to being in serious financial difficulty.

 

The idea of meeting with a Bankruptcy Trustee can perhaps be intimating or feel like a blow to self-esteem. As you might imagine though, we have met with men, women and couples from all walks of life; all ages, occupations and backgrounds. Ultimately: anyone can find themselves with debt problems and that’s when we can be of help.

 

Meeting with a Trustee, here’s what to expect:

  1. Call or email us to schedule a confidential, no-cost, no-obligation appointment. We have several locations where we can meet and flexible office hours. You will be asked to bring along (or know) some of your financial details such as monthly expenses, debts (and to whom) and your monthly income.
  2. The Trustee will review the information you have provided and go through the options available to you, what may happen, the costs and timeframe surrounding your options. These might include Informal proposal, consumer proposal or bankruptcy. (Only a Trustee can help you file a consumer proposal or bankruptcy)
  3. If we cannot help you, we will recommend options to you and refer you to someone who may be of assistance.
  4. You will always have time to review and consider your options. We will not pressure you to make a decision. You will have a better understanding of the options available to address your debt problems and you will understand the next steps and implications.
  5. If you enter into a formalized process to address your debts, and documents are signed, then garnishees and collection calls will stop.

Remember, debt problems can happen to anyone. A Grant Thornton Trustee can be a source of important information and guidance to help you toward solutions—and peace of mind.

If you are facing financial struggles or would like some help with managing your debt—one of our professionals is available to discuss your situation. There are many options available to help and you may not need to go bankrupt. Contact us for a confidential, no-obligation, complimentary consultation. Call us toll free at  (your area code)310 8888.



Take a ‘staycation’ . . . and other creative ways to have fun and spend less.

It’s summer and thoughts turn to fun ways to spend time and . . . (unfortunately) money. Whether it’s a family vacation, home improvements, backyard parties or out-of-town visitors – the impact on your wallet can be significant.

If you are already struggling with a worrying debt load, it’s likely time to change what you do this summer.

A recent BMO travel study found that more than half of all Canadians plan travel within their home province this year (in Albertans that number is an outstanding 81 per cent). This scaling back on vacation plans is due in part to cost-conscious Canadians who also see the impact of rising gas prices and are seeking to build savings; all positive news—and even more relevant if you need to address debt.

Paying off debt doesn’t have to be viewed as a burden, in fact, it should be viewed as an accomplishment. Reducing debt brings a sense of relief. Focusing on paying off your debt can provide an opportunity to explore cost-cutting alternatives to many summer activities.

Consider these ways to spend less and have fun:

  • ‘Staycation’: plan a ‘holiday’ in your own province. Be a tourist in your own City of one nearby. Load up on traveler information and see the sites you often overlook because they’re close to home.
  • Host a backyard ‘drive in’. Set up your TV outside for an evening video-fest and make it a pot luck BBQ or picnic with friends and family. (Maybe invite your close neighbours too, if it’s likely to get noisy!)
  • Camp in your own back yard. Adults and children alike can enjoy a night star gazing or reading under canvass. The bathroom and fridge are nearby and if it rains: enough said!
  • If you’re game to try crafts or Do-it-Yourself to save money on entertainment or home improvement projects, social sites like Pinterest and Houzz can be fun tools to get your creative ideas flowing.

 Remember to use the money you ‘save’ for debt repayment first—and start with high interest rate credit cards:

If you are facing financial struggles or would like some help with managing your debt—one of our professionals is available to discuss your situation. There are many options available to help and you may not need to go bankrupt. Contact us for a confidential, no-obligation, complimentary consultation. Call us toll free from anywhere in Western Canada 310 8888.

The curse of the ‘broke bride’: and other financial considerations as love blooms.

Wedding season will soon be in full swing with many Canadians will tying the knot and making the journey down they isle for better or for worse. Sadly, almost half of these marriages will end in divorce, stats citing that money issues are a leading cause of marital strife and the eventual demise.

So what should you be thinking about before that life changing day? What questions should you be asking?

Prior to marriage – learn about your partner’s attitude towards money. Are they are saver? A spender? Dependent on credit cards or a ‘buy now pay later’ purchaser? You want to know sooner than later if you have a similar vision and goals regarding how you will spend and save your money. 

Have the talk–Do you know your soon-to-be souses financial status? Do they have student loans that remain unpaid, or a car worth less than the loan out on it? Is their credit score damaged? You should know the financial health of your partner, good or bad. A poor financial past can put a cramp in your plans to buy a house down the road, so talk about it early and have a plan, if needed, to move past it.

Heads-up on – the wedding budget. Lavish events with big budgets may seem the norm in today’s celebrity focused culture but it’s far beyond the reach for most of us. So, for the rest of us being money minded leading up to the big event can be a necessity, because the reality is, overspending on the wedding day can leave a bitter debt ‘aftertaste’. Bottom line: a wedding is a celebration . . . but a marriage is a long-term commitment. Setting a responsible budget for a wedding based on your means (including savings and/or family contributions) can go a long way to starting a marriage in a financially stable position.

How much debt is your fiancé bringing to the marriage? Their current financial obligations will now impact your ‘family’ finances for day-to-day living—and, your future plans. Ask too if they are current with their obligations to Revenue Canada (CRA). You won’t be liable for any debt they have to CRA but it’s an indication of their approach to personal finances—and, has implication to your joint lifestyle if they have significant arrears to address. Keep in mind: financial irresponsibility can lead to a poor credit score, later affecting the probability – or ease – of buying a new home or other large joint purchase.

If you intend to register or re-register real property (home, vacation property) in joint names upon marriage, get advice from a lawyer first. Understand the implications—including the very real likelihood that each of you is then deemed to have equal, shared ownership. Consider: you may have brought more assets to the marriage and if your partner was later to go bankrupt, half of (now) joint assets could be lost. 

Getting a supplemental credit card under your spouse’s existing card may seem to make sense and perhaps comes with a ‘romantic notion’ of your new status as a couple. Understand the risk: the moment you make your first purchase on that secondary card you are now jointly and severally liable for all charges on that card whether made by you or your spouse. If your spouse defaults on the credit card you are responsible for the entire debt.

If you are facing financial struggles or would like some help with managing your debt—one of our professionals is available to discuss your situation. There are many options available to help and you may not need to go bankrupt. Contact us for a confidential, no-obligation, complimentary consultation toll free from anywhere in Western Canada 310 8888.

Visit us online www.gtdebt.ca or www.gt.alger.ca