Brokenhearted with an Empty Wallet—Warning Signs of Online Relationship Scams

BlostPost - Brokenhearted with an empty walletAs a Licensed Insolvency Trustee, I hear a variety of facts, circumstances and events that have led to one’s financial distress. Being victimized through an online relationship scam can leave someone both emotionally and financially devastated.

According to the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre, online relationship scams are the highest grossing scam compared to other internet frauds. As is usually the case, the online dating starts out innocently on a legitimate dating website, but evolves with intention by the perpetrator to ultimately steal money from the innocent party. It’s tough to pinpoint the exact number of people in Canada who have been victimized by an online dating scam, because a person is usually too embarrassed or ashamed to admit that they were taken advantage of.

The most heartbreaking story I’ve heard was from a lady who was involved in a nearly one year online relationship which was ultimately discovered to be fraudulent.  Throughout the “relationship”, she lost in excess of $100,000—her entire life savings—from a series of wire transfers to the perpetrator.  She didn’t see the warning signs at the time. Why? She believed him.  She was in a time in her post-divorce life where she was desperately seeking companionship and he preyed upon that.

With love being top of mind during the month of February, those involved in online relationships should take time to evaluate whether their relationship is causing them financial distress.

Look for the non-financial warning signs by asking yourself:

  1. Is he/she “too good to be true”? Have your guard up if they appear perfect or are giving you all the right answers all the time.
  1. Is he/she transitioning the contact from the dating site to personal email, text or phone? If so, they may be moving into their next phase—gaining trust and more personal information from you outside of the restrictions of a bona fide dating website.
  1. Is he/she making excuses for not being able to meet in person (i.e., problems with their travel visa or lost passport)? Keep their reasons for not being able to meet in your back pocket and determine if there is a pattern.

Look for the financial warning signs by asking yourself:

  1. Am I being asked about my financial background in the early stages of the relationship? If they want to know how much you earn, the car you drive, whether you invest, or the kinds of credit cards you have, you’re being sized up. This is the start of their attempt to gain access to your assets, money and credit.
  1. Am I considering sending money to this person and why? Scammers often use the excuse of an “emergency” or “crises”, like a sick family member. The dollar amounts usually start out small, but progressively get higher and with more frequency.
  1. Am I using credit more frequently to cover living expenses or taking out bank loans? Finding yourself with more money issues since you’ve started the online “relationship” should be a clear warning sign.

Taking these simple steps can prevent you from falling victim to an online dating scam:

  • Tell a family member or close friend about your new relationship.  Victims have told me in hindsight that had they told a friend about the first wire transfer of money, matters wouldn’t have escalated.  If you’re blinded by love, let your friend or family member be that voice of reason.
  • Don’t release financial information about yourself and never send money to someone you’ve met online.  Be clear from the start that there will be no discussions about your finances, and if a request for money is made stop communications immediately.  If these conditions are a problem for the other person, then you’ll know where their intentions lie.


If you are concerned that you are being financially targeted in an online relationship, you should contact your bank immediately to stop payment on any cheques or money transfers you’ve recently issued.  Unfortunately, any money you’ve given the perpetrator up until that point is money you’re never going to see back.  Next, report the matter to the RCMP.  You’ll likely be directed to file a report with the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre.

If you are now facing overwhelming debt because of a fraudulent online relationship, it’s important to speak to a Licensed Insolvency Trustee.  The emotional toll of not only losing the relationship, but your savings as well, can make it extremely difficult to focus on resolving your situation. A Licensed Insolvency Trustee can help sort out the situation and help you come up with a viable solution to your financial troubles. Practical solutions such as budget adjustments, debt consolidation and a consumer proposal are all options to consider before bankruptcy.

We can’t mend your broken heart, but we can help mend the hole in your wallet.

Freida Richer LIT

 

Freida Richer is a Licensed Insolvency Trustee with our Edmonton, Alberta practice. You can watch her Money Smarts segment on the third Monday of every month on Global Morning News Edmonton.

A Tough Pill to Swallow – The Link Between Your Medical and Financial Health

BlostPost - Medical and Financial HealthIn Canada, we’re fortunate to have a health care system that covers our basic medical needs. Therefore, as a Licensed Insolvency Trustee, I don’t come across a lot of situations where people are in debt due to unpaid medical bills and invoices. What I do see however, is the impact of how a medical condition or health related issue can prevent a person from continuing to pay their financial responsibilities like mortgages, vehicles payments or credit card bills. In fact, according to Grant Thornton’s 2017 numbers, 20%, of those we helped cited medical or health-related issues as a contributing factor to their debt situation. That’s one in five of all people who filed a bankruptcy or consumer proposal with us last year.

WHAT HAPPENS WHEN MEDICAL SITUATIONS ARISE?

When I listen to peoples’ stories about how their medical or health well being is linked to the state of their financial affairs, it is incredible how every situation can be so different, yet result in the same thing; that people lose the stability of an income and the ability to continue to service their debt payments.

For example:

  • Workplace injuries that evolve from being short term downtime to more lengthier recovery periods and, in some cases, people finding they are unable to return to work.
  • People who’ve suffered from severe depression for many years and have a pattern of being unable to sustain employment because of their condition.
  • Those with an acute or short term medical condition that actually turned into a longer term/chronic condition which resulted in the inability to work can be financially devastating to households, especially when it happens to the sole income provider.

Lastly, serious & unexpected news, such as a cancer diagnosis, hits you like a brick wall and can put you and your family in a financial tailspin.  When my husband was diagnosed with stage 4 colon cancer over 10 years ago, it was very difficult to focus on anything other than fighting the disease.  So, when people come to me saying everything was a blur, I fully understand that. It wasn’t because they were being negligent, it’s just such a difficult time.

According to the (CCAN) Canadian Cancer Action Network, a family dealing with cancer goes into debt an average of $30,000 to $40,000 in the first three months from:

  • lost income to not one but maybe both partners
  • increased daycare costs for your children because you have to be with your partner or spouse;
  • increased travel expenses for fuel, parking costs at the treatment facility and staying in a hotel (if it’s out of town)
  • medical equipment and drugs that aren’t covered

So, what occurs is a reliance on credit to supplement the reduced income flowing into the household.

WHAT CAN YOU DO IF YOU’RE IN THIS SITUATION?

Check with your employer on the availability of paid sick leave and other benefits you are entitled to receive such as

  • Workers Compensation;
  • Short term (up to max. 17 weeks) and Long term disability insurance – so that you can get paid a % of your salary while you’re not working; If you don’t have disability insurance through employment, you can claim Canadian Employment Insurance (EI benefits) (NOTE: employers are not required to have a LTD plan for employees; it is discretionary.)
  • Other health benefits through your employment

Unfortunately, if you’re self-employed or unemployed, you have to rely on savings or borrowing money if you don’t have disability insurance.

If you have additional private health insurance (ie. Alberta Blue Cross),determine what additional health benefits and coverage you may have.

  • If you have it, look into your Mortgage Protection Insurance (this is NOT the same as “Mortgage Insurance”, which protects the lender if you default on the mortgage and is required if your down payment is less than 20% ). MPI is essentially a type of life insurance that pays you (MI pays the bank/lender) a lump sum to use towards paying your mortgage if you become disabled or pass away.  As with any insurance program, there is a premium you’ll pay on top of your mortgage.
  • If you have it, look into your critical illness insurance on credit cards and loans.This type of insurance pays the minimum payments on your loan or credit card for a certain period of time if you fall ill or are unable to work due to an accident. Generally, it won’t pay off the entire balance owing.
  • Don’t ignore your bills.To prevent delinquent accounts, you may have to dip into your savings or emergency fund to continue with the debt payments until you’re back to work. If focusing on bills is tough for you during this time, seek help from family members or friends to remind you or to help facilitate the payment of your bills.
  • If you’re in a situation where the debt is overwhelming, set up a free consultation with one of our Licensed Insolvency Trustees to talk about what you can do if your medical condition is causing a temporary downtime or if the situation is more long term.

One of the benefits of a Consumer Proposal is that you can reduce your debt payments while your income is low and you will be protected from collection action while you focus on your medical situation and getting better!

Other Helpful links:

Freida Richer LIT

 

Freida Richer is a Licensed Insolvency Trustee with our Edmonton, Alberta practice. You can watch her Money Smarts segment on the third Monday of every month on Global Morning News Edmonton.

Tackle Your Debt in 2018 Using SMART Goals

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SETTING SMART FINANCIAL GOALS FOR 2018

Now that we’re a few weeks into 2018 and you’re thinking about your goals or resolutions for the year, it’s the perfect time to reflect on where you sit financially and tackle your debt. Perhaps, you have already set out to be more physically fit by signing up for those hot yoga classes, or are tapping into your mental wellness by dedicating five minutes to meditation. While these are all great goals, why not round out 2018 by focusing on improving your financial wellbeing?

With any goal, financial or otherwise, it takes thoughtful planning and organizing to be carried through.  Avoid delays in your achievements by setting SMART goals to keep you focused, organized and on track for success. SMART goals are one of many goal planning tools that can be used to organize and track your financial progress throughout 2018.

SMART goals consist of 5 key components. They must be Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant and Time-Bound. When developing your SMART goals, keep these helpful tips in mind:

1. Be specific about what you want to accomplish. Think about “what” is important to you and why?

2. Make sure the goal is measurable to help track your progress. Assign numbers or percentages to your financial goal, like “paying down $10,000 of debt” or “saving 10% of each paycheque”

3. & 4. Have an achievable and realistic goal. Think about the factors that are outside of your control and how those factors could impact your success.  If the goal isn’t realistic, think about what is achievable and plan from there.

5. Set specific milestones throughout the year to measure your progress.  For example, if your goal is to build an emergency fund, think about how much you want to have saved in 3 months’ time. At the end of each quarter, check-in on to see if you’re meeting your goal..  If you’re on track, great – keep doing what you’re doing. If not, make adjustments to ensure you reach your target at the next check-in point.

To make planning SMART goals easier, check out online goal tracking tools like Goal-Buddy.com.


STAYING FINANCIALLY MOTIVATED IN 2018

Staying motivated to achieve these goals can be difficult, especially when it comes to reducing debt and saving money. It’s easy for anyone to have set backs when it comes to financial planning, as it involves changing habits that can be difficult to break like spending less, learning to budget and putting a stop to using your credit cards.

To help you achieve your 2018 financial goals, our Licensed Insolvency Trustees shared their top tips kii.,/,to staying financially motivated:

Continue reading

#GTKnowledgeisMoney – Top Money Management Tips from Peers

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Since Financial Literacy Month has officially wrapped, we’d like to express our gratitude to everyone who joined the conversation online to share their best money management advice. We received an overwhelming amount of submissions and loved reading everyone’s advice on how they manage their finances.

The financial tips from the community were so great that we decided to share some of the tips people submitted – after all, the campaign was all about peer-to-peer sharing, so in our minds, these tips can’t be shared enough!

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We also want to send a big congratulations to ANDREA DUNCAN, who was the winner of the #GTKnowledgeisMoney $500 prize!

Thank-you to everyone who participated – even if the official month of financial literacy is over, the learning should never stop.

If you’re looking for debt management advice, our experienced team of Licensed Insolvency Trustees are available for free consultations at any of our locations across Canada, to meet with you and provide the best debt solutions for your particular financial situation.

We believe every one deserves a chance for a financial fresh start. We look forward to hearing from you!

#GTKnowledgeisMoney – Know Your Financial Rights and Responsibilities

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As part of our #GTKnowledgeisMoney series, we’ve been sharing our financial advice on the different themes throughout Financial Literacy Month, you can read them here:

This week is focused on consumers knowing their financial rights and responsibilities. It’s important to know your rights and responsibilities to help guide your decisions.

Here is a list of tips to help you better understand your rights and responsibilities:

Banking:

  • You have a right to open a personal bank account and cannot be turned away if you are unemployed, unable to deposit money in the account immediately or if you’ve been bankrupt.
  • You have a responsibility to provide sufficient ID to the financial institution and your SIN if you are opening an account that earns interest.
  • You have a right to receive a copy of your account agreement within 7 business days from opening your account including information on the interest rate (if applicable) and how interest earned on the account is calculated.
  • You have a right to receive 30-days of notice regarding any increases to fees or new charges on your bank account.
  • You have a right to withdraw the first $100 from any cheque you deposit UNLESS:
    • Your account is less than 3 months old;
    • The cheque has been endorsed more than once;
    • The cheque is deposited more than 6 months from its date;
    • The cheque is not in Canadian dollars;
    • The cheque was issued from an account situated outside of Canada; or
    • The financial institution has reasonable grounds to believe that illegal or fraudulent activity has taken place.
  • You are responsible for protecting your personal information when banking online such as keeping confidential your debit and credit card information, user IDs, passwords and PIN numbers.

Credit Cards and Loans

  • You have a right to receive a statement every month detailing items like your account balance and transactions, interest charged, maximum and remaining credit limit.
  • Joint borrowers on credit cards have a right to receive the same statements as other borrowers.
  • You are responsible for reviewing your any loan or credit card agreement to understand the terms and conditions of the loan or your use of the credit card.
  • You are responsible for paying the minimum payment calculated on your credit card statement by the due date if you cannot pay off your balance in full.
  • Co-borrowers on the same credit account are responsible for the full balance owing on the account.
  • You are responsible for immediately notifying the credit card company if you lose your card or are a victim of fraud.
  • You have a right to not be charged overdraft fees or interest for prepaid credit cards unless you’ve given your consent to the financial institution.
  • You have a right to the investigation of a disputed or unauthorized transaction on your credit card.

Grant Thornton Limited is an experienced team of Licensed Insolvency Trustees who provide advice to clients who are looking for financial guidance and assistance across the country. Grant Thornton offers clients help with financial counselling, debt restructuring, consumer proposals and bankruptcy. Find an office near you for a free consultation by clicking here.

Want a chance to win a $500 prize?  All you need to do is share your money management advice online with us.

To be eligible for the contest, entrants must:

Contest is open to all Canadian residents. Deadline for entry is Thursday, November 30th, 2017 at 11:59 pm AST. Winner will be selected through random draw. Full contest rules here. 

Tell us how you achieve financial wellbeing by using the hashtag #GTKnowledgeisMoney on Facebook or Twitter.

#GTKnowledgeIsMoney – How to Teach Children About Money

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Financial Literacy Month is about helping Canadians establish healthy financial habits. When it comes to your finances do you ever find yourself thinking “Wow, I wish I knew that years ago!”?

That’s why it’s never too early to start teaching kids about money.

That brings us to this week’s topic – How do I teach my children about money?

Teaching children about money is an ongoing process that helps them to understand money management early on and provide helpful skills to prepare them for adulthood.

Here is our step by step guide to help you get started:

  1. Get them involved
  • Teach your kids about what the different methods of payments are and how they work (ie the debit card – and the idea that there is always money there – money doesn’t grow on trees).
  • Talk to them about the budget and how much things cost and where the money comes from. Keep them on a budget (needs vs wants).
  1. Have a conversation about money and budgets early on
  • Don’t wait to have a conversation with your children about how to budget, teach them how to budget and keep the conversation going.
  1. Talk to them about credit and how it works
  • Tell them about the importance of having an emergency/savings plan.
  1. Give your kids an allowance for work
  • Pay your children an amount that you are comfortable with when they do chores around the house. If they do not do the chore, then don’t pay them as this teaches them that they must work hard to earn money.

How do you teach your kids about money? Share with us on social media for a chance to win a $500 prize using the hashtag #GTKnowledgeisMoney

#GTKnowledgeisMoney – How to Manage Money for Student Life

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Since we know a thing or two about financial counselling, Financial Literacy Month is happening throughout the month of November and focuses on strengthening the financial literacy of Canadians.

Grant Thornton Limited is sharing the #GTKnowledgeIsMoney series, focused on money tips from experts and peers.

Everyone has different financial needs at different times in their lives and it’s important to understand what steps you can take to create a better future for yourself or family.  Grant Thornton has a team of Licensed Insolvency Trustees across Canada who provide advice to clients who are looking for financial guidance and assistance. Grant Thornton offers clients help with financial counselling, debt restructuring, consumer proposals and bankruptcy.

This week we are focused on managing money as a student and how to create a budget while being in school.

Here is a list of tips to help students manage their money:

  • Use your student loans wisely: Student loans are just that, loans, and they must be paid back with interest added. Make sure to use your loans wisely, don’t use it if you don’t have to, and understand what the interest amount will be in the end.
  • Find an interesting, non-stressful way to track your spending: Often times we get so caught up in the busy school life, we just pull out the wallet and charge the credit card. Find an app or tracking tool that works for you. For example, download an app on your phone such as Mint, or create a note section on your phone, or carry around a small notebook. Then once a week, find a cozy place to review your lists, to see where you can see where your money went, and try to spend a little less the next week, and save a little money.
  • Know your budget, and use gift cards only: Figure out what your weekly spend will be on groceries, coffee, gas, and eating out and then purchase gift cards for your spending each week. Once the cards are depleted, don’t spend any more until the next week when you purchase a new card.
  • Budget how much you want to spend when going out on the town, then take cash only with you; this can help you limit what you spend and wracking up your credit cards.
  • Watch for ‘dollar drains’: These are small repeat purchases that add up to a considerable amount over a month’s time. You don’t necessarily need to deprive yourself of what you enjoy, but find ways to limit the amount you spend. An example can include making coffee at home in the morning as opposed to buying a $3 coffee every day.

Are you drowning in student debt? Our team of Licensed Insolvency Trustees help provide debt solutions to those who are struggling financially. Contact a location near you to set up a free consultation.

Do you have tips on how student can manage their money? Share it with us online using #GTknowledgeisMoney and tag Grant Thornton Limited for a chance to win $500.  Full contest details here

Check back next Monday where we’ll share our advice on how to teach your children about money.

#GTKnowledgeisMoney – How to Live Within Your Means

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Financial Literacy Month is happening throughout the month of November and focuses on strengthening the financial literacy of Canadians.

Grant Thornton Limited has launched the #GTKnowledgeIsMoney series, a campaign focused around money tips from experts and peers. Everyone has different financial needs at different times in their lives and it’s important to understand what steps you can take to create a better future for yourself or family. We want to help Canadians learn more about how to manage their finances and what they can do to strengthen their financial knowledge.

This week’s topic is about how to live within your means.

Living within your means is an ongoing process that helps you achieve your financial goals. Here is our step by step guide to help you get started:

  1. Set a budget
  • Half the battle is knowing how much money you make and what you need to spend every month.
  1. Know the difference between needs and wants
  • Go back to the basics and prioritize your spending. Create a list of the essentials that are needed to survive and budget from there.
  1. Do not rely on credit cards
  • Credit cards provide a false sense of security for your monthly budget. These funds are not free and come with a price that effects your future cash flow.
  1. Create an emergency fund
  • Saving up a nest egg for those months when expenses can run higher than your income will lessen the burden to your budget and reduce your use of credit.

Grant Thornton Limited is a team of Licensed Insolvency Trustees who provide expert advice to clients who are looking for financial guidance and assistance across the country. Grant Thornton offers clients help with financial counselling, debt restructuring, consumer proposals and bankruptcy. Find an office near you for a free consultation by clicking here.

Want a chance to win a $500 prize? All you need to do is share your money management advice online with us using the hashtag #GTKnowledgeisMoney, tagging Grant Thornton Limited on Facebook or @GTDebtRelief on Twitter.

For full contest rules, click here.

Check back next Monday to read our advice on how to manage money for student life.

#GTKnowledgeIsMoney – How to Achieve Financial Wellbeing

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Financial Literacy Month is happening throughout the month of November and focuses on strengthening the financial literacy of Canadians.

Grant Thornton Limited has launched the #GTKnowledgeIsMoney series, a campaign focused around money management tips from experts and peers. Everyone has different financial needs at different times in their lives, and it’s important to understand what steps you can take to create a better future for yourself or your family. We want to help Canadians learn more about how to manage their finances and what they can do to strengthen their financial knowledge.

This week’s topic is about how to achieve financial wellbeing.

First, what is financial wellbeing?

Financial wellbeing is defined as a state of being wherein you:

  • Have control over day-to-day finances
  • Have the capacity to absorb financial shock
  • Are on track to meet your financial goals, and
  • Have the financial freedom to make the choices that allow you to enjoy life

Achieving financial wellbeing is an ongoing, multi step process. Here is our step by step guide to help you get started:

  1. Set financial goals for the short term as well as the long term
  • Create SMART goals – Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic, Time Based
  • Goals should be reviewed periodically and are likely to change over time
  • Create a Personal Financial Net Worth Statement and review annually
  1. Create a household budget
  • Track your fixed and variable household costs
  • Set limits and look for ways to reduce variable costs
  • For discretionary spending, do a “needs vs wants” assessment prior to spending
  1. Manage your available credit and use your credit to your advantage
  • Pay bills and monthly debt payments on time to improve your credit score – this helps you get the best interest rates available with the lowest collateral required
  • Review your credit score annually and ensure all errors are corrected
  • Consider closing unused credit that you do not need
  1. Manage your accumulated debt – review your debt and set a debt reduction strategy
  • List all your debt, both secured and unsecured
  • Create a debt reduction strategy that fits within your budget created above, and be reasonable with timelines (you didn’t accumulate the debt overnight, so it won’t go away overnight)
  • Target higher interest unsecured debt first as a means to improve your monthly cash flow. As cash flow improves, consider increasing your monthly debt reduction payments
  1. Save for the future / set up an emergency fund
  • Don’t neglect savings while concentrating on your debt repayment strategy. Unplanned or emergency costs often occur, and without savings available, credit is often used
  • Ensure you have life insurance appropriate to your personal situation. Obtaining life insurance at an early age is more cost effective than waiting until later years
  • Utilize RRSP’s for long-term savings. These provide a tax reduction in the year saved, however they should only be accessed at retirement due to the taxes due when liquidated
  • Utilize non-registered savings vehicles (TSFA, high interest bank accounts, non-registered mutual funds etc.) for shorter term savings, as these can be accessed in emergencies with little to no liquidation cost

Grant Thornton Limited is a team of Licensed Insolvency Trustees who provide expert advice to clients who are looking for financial guidance and assistance across the country. Grant Thornton offers clients help with financial counselling, debt restructuring, consumer proposals and bankruptcy. Find an office near you for a free consultation by clicking here.

Want a chance to win a $500 prize?  All you need to do is share your money management advice online with us.

To be eligible for the contest, entrants must:

Contest is open to all Canadian residents. Deadline for entry is Thursday, November 30th, 2017 at 11:59 pm AST. Winner will be selected through random draw. Full contest rules here. 

Tell us how you achieve financial wellbeing by using the hashtag #GTKnowledgeisMoney on Facebook or Twitter.

Check back next week to read our advice on how to live within your means.

Financial Literacy Month – #GTKnowledgeisMoney Contest

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November is Financial Literacy Month. This month is all about strengthening financial literacy of Canadians and empowering them to manage money and debt wisely, save for the future and understand their financial rights and responsibilities.

Knowing the importance of financial literacy, Grant Thornton Limited is launching a #GTKnowledgeisMoney series, an online campaign focused around money tips from experts and peers.

Throughout November, our team of Licensed Insolvency Trustees will be sharing their expert tips on money management best practices at different stages of life on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and our blog, but we also want to hear your money management advice too for a chance to win a $500 prize.

To be entered to win the $500 prize, entrants must:

  • Share their best money management tips on social media, tagging Grant Thornton Limited on Facebook or @GTDebtRelief on Twitter, using the hashtag #GTKnowledgeisMoney
  • For an extra entry, follow Grant Thornton Limited on Facebook & Twitter
  • Contest is open to all residents of Canada, excluding Québec, having reached the legal age of majority in their province or territory of residence prior to the Contest Period. Deadline for entry is Thursday, November 30th, 2017 at 11:59 pm AST. Winner will be selected through random draw. To read the full contest rules, click here.

Be sure to follow along on our blog and social media channels as we’ll be sharing our financial advice to different generations each week.

Connect with us on social media and be a part of the conversation to help financial literacy:

Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GrantThorntonLimited/

Tweet us: https://twitter.com/GTDebtRelief

Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/showcase/10795238/admin/updates/